National Consultations

The PCC has an opportunity to respond to national consultations regarding policing and crime matters. Details of these consultations and the Commissioner’s responses can be found below.

 

The Association of Police & Crime Commissioners (APCC) were asked to develop a draft protocol for the the powers of Section 38 of the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011. This is essentially the powers of PCCs to require Chief Constables to resign or retire.

PCCs were consulted on the draft protocol and asked to provide comments.

The Association of Police & Crime Commissioners (APCC) were asked to develop proposals to increase the influence of PCCs and Other Policing Governance Bodies at a national level.

PCCs were consulted on these proposals and asked to provide comments.

The National Crime Agency (NCA) produced a draft Annual Plan which set out the NCA’s priorities, and how it planned to exercise its functions and build capabilities, for 2014/2015, in leading the fight to cut serious and organised crime.

The NCA requested feedback from strategic partners regarding the content of the draft Annual Plan document.

Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) requested the thoughts of Police & Crime Commissioners regarding the draft inspection programme for 2014/2015.

The Public Administration Select Committee (PASC) announced an inquiry into crime statistics.

The PASC invited responses from Police & Crime Commissioners in response to specific questions.

The Home Office has inivted views on the regulation of services and the extent of the powers of the Forensic Science Regulator (RSC) through a consultation.

The Home Office consultation set out proposals to ensure that Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs) have the necessary powers to protect the public and serve their community.

The College of Policing (CoP) Strategic Intent outlined plans to enhance and set standards in policing, accredit educational providers and forge closer links between policing, academics and universities to assess what really works in reducing crime.

The Home Affairs Select Committee (HASC) launched an inquiry into Police & Crime Commissioners (PCCs) – Progress to Date. The HASC inquiry examined the work and effectiveness of PCCs to date.

The College of Policing is developing a Code of Ethics for policing in England and Wales. This Code is the highest-level declaration of the principles and standards of behaviour expected. The Code of Ethics provides a framework to set and maintain the highest possible standards from everyone in policing in England and Wales and the College of Policing have consulted with all interested stakeholders regarding the draft Code of Ethics.